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Plan International: Guinea Ebola Epidemic Threatening to Become a Regional Crisis

Ibrahima Touré, Plan International's Country Director in Guinea, warns that communities in the border areas between Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone are vulnerable to the virus and need immediate support.
Ibrahima Touré, Plan International's Country Director in Guinea, warns that communities in the border areas between Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone are vulnerable to the virus and need immediate support.
March 24, 2014

CONAKRY, Guinea – The Ebola epidemic in the Republic of Guinea is threatening to become a regional health crisis endangering a vast population, warns humanitarian organization Plan International.

The region of Forest Guinea, where most of the 59 reported deaths have occurred, is close to the border with Sierra Leone and Liberia. A few suspected cases have already been reported in Sierra Leone.

Plan works in the worst-affected areas of Forest Guinea and is calling for a coordinated emergency response involving Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone to contain the deadly virus. The organization has started supporting the Guinean authorities which have launched a full-fledged response to the Ebola crisis.

“The Ebola fever is one of the most virulent diseases known to mankind with a fatality rate up to 90 percent. Communities in the affected region stretch across the borders and people move freely within this area. This poses a serious risk of the epidemic becoming widespread with devastating consequences,” said Ibrahima Touré, Plan International Country Director in Guinea.

“Communities, especially children, in the border areas between Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone are vulnerable and need immediate support. A large scale preventive action will need to be put in place rapidly,” he added.

Plan staff in the affected area report that people are extremely concerned about the lethal Ebola virus which spreads by contact with infected people or animals. “Even though most people are going about their normal business, there is a strong fear of the disease in the communities. A few people have even left the affected area for Conakry,” said Mamady Dramé, Plan’s program unit manager in Macenta, Forest Guinea.

“Rumors about the disease are rife in the affected areas. Sudden deaths of people have given rise to all sorts of stories among the population. The authorities, aware of the potential panic, are trying their best to encourage people to only consider information released by local officials and messages broadcast on local radio.

“Local authorities are working with religious leaders in mosques and churches to provide information to people on preventive measures. It is critical that people receive clear and accurate information on what they can do to protect themselves,” he added.

There is no treatment or vaccine available for Ebola fever. It therefore poses a huge challenge for the Guinean authorities to stop the virus from spreading.

As a first response, Plan will join the Guinean authorities in disseminating information on preventive measures at the national level through radio, TV and SMS. In Forest Guinea, Plan will particularly target children and schools in the communities. It will also provide logistical support to the Guinean government in responding to the emergency.

Note to Editors: Plan experts in Conakry and staff on the ground are available for media interviews.

About Plan International USA

Plan International USA is part of the Plan International Federation, a global organization that works side by side with communities in 50 developing countries to end the cycle of poverty for children and their families. Plan works at the community level to develop customized solutions and ensure long-term sustainability. Our solutions are designed up-front to be owned by communities for generations to come and range from clean water and healthcare programs to education projects and child protection initiatives. For more information, please visit www.PlanUSA.org.

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