Ghana

Stories from change-makers in Ghana

Fasila Deborah Joshua
Sponsored Child In Ghana School Fasila
The odds were stacked against Fasila from the beginning.
Born in rural Ghana, Fasila lived in an area where it was common for girls to drop out of school early to marry or help at home, while their brothers continued with their educations.

But, unlike most girls in her village, she wasn’t even given the opportunity to start school. Fasila was born with a genetic condition that made it difficult for her to walk. In her parents’ minds, this was a second strike against her.

“I was always sad when I was left alone at home,” Fasila said. “All I wanted was to be able to live a normal life just like the other children in my village.”

Still, Fasila refused to give up, and she finally got the chance she was waiting for, through Plan’s Reach program. A groundbreaking accelerated learning approach for children ages 8 to 14, this basic education program helps excluded children learn reading, writing and math over a nine-month period, so they’re ready to transition to primary school.

Reach aims to return 90,000 children in Ghana to the classroom. Fasila pleaded with her parents to let her participate, and eventually they relented. Thrilled to be in the classroom, her confidence blossomed — she made friends and thrived academically. Seeing their daughter graduate at the top of her class, her parents realized what Fasila had always known — that she could achieve anything she set her mind to. Fasila passed the assessment exam and is now in primary school, with her parents’ full support.

“I am determined to complete my education and become a nurse so that in the future, I will be able to encourage others who might also find themselves in my situation,” she says proudly.
Give to girls
Former Sponsored Child In Ghana Deborah
Deborah is a second-year student at the Ghana Institute of Journalism.
A former sponsored child with Plan, she has a keen interest in issues around girls’ rights. In this blog, Deborah writes in her own words what she believes it means to be an African child.
What does it mean to be an African child?
Sponsored Child Presenting To Class In Ghana
Joshua grew up in a community with poor roads, no lighting and extreme poverty.
Child marriage and teenage pregnancy were common in his village. More than one in every five girls in Ghana is married before the age of 18.

“For a long time, girls in my community are married off once they become pregnant, sadly bringing an end to their dreams," Joshua says.

After taking part in Plan’s youth advocacy training, Joshua realized he could help to reverse this trend so that more girls have the opportunity to pursue their dreams.

Joshua is working with communities in his district to provide training to children and young people on gender stereotypes, child marriage and child protection.

“Their smiles and the feeling of hope these children display means everything to me," Joshua says. "And that is what drives me."

Men like Joshua are showing other boys what it means to be an ally for girls, and reminding them that gender equality is a fight we must all take on together.
Meet more young people advocating for change

Plan International has been working to improve children’s lives in Ghana since 1992.

Our work in Ghana

Sponsored Girl In Ghana
Offices & operations

Plan Ghana’s project offices are located in Upper West Region, Volta, Eastern Region, Central Region, and Greater Accra. Plan also has support offices in the Bono and Northern regions.

Technical areas

Plan Ghana focuses on the following program areas: education, economic empowerment, health and protection.

Number of sponsored children

As of June 30, 2020, people like you sponsor 22,614 children in Ghana through Plan International.

Our projects in Ghana

Why sponsor with Plan?

Gender equality is a fight we must all take on together. Through sponsorship, you can change lives and create long-term impact in communities.

Fate
The full circle of Fate

When you sponsor a child through through Plan, you form an incredible friendship.

But that’s just the beginning. With Plan, you also have the unique opportunity to:

Send them birthday gifts and cards.

Give them special holiday presents called Little Treasures.

Subscribe them to Plan’s educational kids’ magazine, Sunny Days.

— Visit them (when travel restrictions are lifted), with individual travel assistance from us.

Each gift offering is safely hand-delivered by us, and given to your child with personalized cards from you. It’s likely that the child you sponsor will have never seen anything like these gifts, and with the exception of Little Treasures they’re available year-round to make the bond between you and your sponsored child even stronger.

Meet a child to sponsor