Mozambique

Stories from change-makers in Mozambique

Cassandra Deolinda Domingas
Youth Advocate In Mozambique
Cassandra is a member of Champions of Change, a Plan International program challenging social norms by asking boys and girls to think differently about gender, and encouraging the people around them to do the same.
The group often discusses the many harmful social norms in their communities that threaten young people, particularly girls and young women.

Cassandra is a member of Champions of Change, a Plan International program challenging social norms by asking boys and girls to think differently about gender, and encouraging the people around them to do the same. The group often discusses the many harmful social norms in their communities that threaten young people, particularly girls and young women.

“Women get abused by their brothers, boyfriends and husbands in public which means that they are not safe in their homes. But many people do not report the abuse because they are afraid — or they do not know that it is against the law,” Cassandra says.

To raise awareness about gender-based violence, Plan conducted training sessions with the Champions of Change members, to teach them about the different types of violence and the laws in place to protect girls and women.

“Girls must assist the police and the government in the application of the law because the authorities will not do anything to protect us unless we are confident enough to report cases of violence and domestic abuse," Cassandra says. "Some women and girls think that domestic abuse is a form of discipline and this way of thinking must be changed."
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Girl In Mozambique
When Cyclone Idai struck Mozambique in 2019, Deolinda’s family was one of many forced to seek refuge in a resettlement center after their home was destroyed.
Last year, Deolinda enrolled in Plan International’s Post-Cyclone Livelihood Recovery and Economic Empowerment project, which has helped many young women survive these trying times. Through the program, she received support to open her own food stall.

“Before I had this business, no one in my family had a cellphone which made communication difficult. Now we have a cellphone and a small radio," Deolinda says. "We also did not have nets for fishing, but now that we do. We sell a lot of fish and this keeps my business going. My family still lacks a lot but we are comfortable because we have been able to keep the stall open even during the pandemic.”

Deolinda uses her radio for distance learning. She hopes to one day study economics at university. "The pandemic was a challenge for my family but it taught me that school is important. At school we learn mathematics which has helped me run my business. Now I want to learn more because I am interested in economics and I want my business to grow. This is why I invested my profits from the stall on a radio. During the pandemic, the radio has helped me study and get information."
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Girl Receiving Plan Humanitarian Aid
Domingas lives in an accommodation center for people displaced by Cyclone Idai. Now COVID-19 is posing an additional challenge to their survival.
Thousands of people who lost everything are still living in accommodation centers, with insufficient access to basic facilities, including water, sanitation and hygiene facilities.

“I am currently not going to school because of the pandemic, but before the coronavirus situation I would be absent for a few days when I was menstruating because I did not have adequate materials to manage my periods,” says Domingas.

Plan International has been supporting girls and their families displaced by the cyclone. Working alongside Be Girl Mozambique, we’re distributing reusable menstrual hygiene kits to adolescent girls displaced by the cyclone. Be Girl distributes products free of cost to girls in need and creates affordable access to menstrual products.

So far, over 4,000 girls have been provided with menstrual hygiene kits during the pandemic, including Domingas. “Since I have received the reusable underwear, I can continue to be productive during my menstruation. I can go to school again once they are open, and I will not fall behind on my studies.”
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Plan International has been working to improve children’s lives in Mozambique since 2006.

Our work in Mozambique

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Office & operations

Plan Mozambique’s country office is located in Maputo, with program unit offices in Nampula, Inhambane and Sofala.

Technical areas:

Plan Mozambique focuses on the following program areas: Health, education, disaster response and preparedness, skills and work

Number of sponsored children in FY20:

As of June 2020, Plan International sponsors 14,599 children in Mozambique.

Why sponsor with Plan?

Gender equality is a fight we must all take on together. Through sponsorship, you can change lives and create long-term impact in communities.

Fate
The full circle of Fate

When you sponsor a child through through Plan, you form an incredible friendship.

But that’s just the beginning. With Plan, you also have the unique opportunity to:

Send them birthday gifts and cards.

Give them special holiday presents called Little Treasures.

Subscribe them to Plan’s educational kids’ magazine, Sunny Days.

— Visit them (when travel restrictions are lifted), with individual travel assistance from us.

Each gift offering is safely hand-delivered by us, and given to your child with personalized cards from you. It’s likely that the child you sponsor will have never seen anything like these gifts, and with the exception of Little Treasures they’re available year-round to make the bond between you and your sponsored child even stronger.

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