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Nepal: Fighting Against Child Trafficking

July 2012 – June 2015

Why are children trafficked? Sometimes girls are lured by false offers of arranged marriages. Sometimes their families willingly sell them. However, in many situations, parents simply do not know that they are giving up their daughters for a life in the sex trade.

Project Updates

Nepal’s unemployment rate is 46 percent, and many families and children have no option but to work. The practice of migrating to find labor makes children even more vulnerable to trafficking. Often they do not realize what kind of employment awaits them, but many times they have no other option.

The trafficking of children is perhaps the most horrific violation of human rights. Stripped of a family, a community, an education, and an opinion, a trafficked child is unable to pull herself out of a life of violence, exploitation, and servitude. While the subversive nature of human trafficking makes reliable data difficult to collect, an estimated 11,000 girls are trafficked every year from Nepal into India and other countries, primarily for prostitution.

We are working in the districts of Banke, Sunsari, and Rautahat, which lie on the Indian border and face a high risk of trafficking. We aim to reach over 25,000 girls, first to prevent this ruinous practice by educating families and community members on the risks of child trafficking, as well as by promoting government leadership to prevent trafficking. Second, we are working to rescue children who have fallen victim to this crime and create a safe haven through rehabilitation centers to help these children transition back into the community.

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