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Vietnam: Livelihood Advancement Business School (LABS)

Plan International’s Livelihood Advancement Business School (LABS) gave young people the opportunity to learn a specialist talent to give them a brighter, more positive future. LABS was an innovative model that offered livelihoods and soft skills training to youth in an environment of interactive learning and mentorship. Plan had implemented the LABS model since 2004 and had trained more than 4,000 young people. The LABS program worked with youth from rural areas to develop marketable skills in customer relations and sales, hospitality, accounting, and ICT and then partners students with numerous corporations such as Big C Supermarket, Hanoi Daewoo Hotel, Sheraton Hotel, CyberSoft Company, Highlands Coffee, and others. More than 80 percent of the trainees who have graduated from the LABS program have secured jobs each year since 2008.

In the second phase of the project, the LABS program became a local Vietnamese nongovernmental organization (NGO) under the name REACH, which is still receives some financials and operational support from Plan. REACH specializes in vocational training and employment for underprivileged youth from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds, including youth with disabilities. The Vietnam LABS approach has been so successful that it was adapted for other countries and communities and was implemented by Plan in Thailand, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Egypt, Sudan, South Sudan, Kenya, and Tanzania. Plan built the capacity of REACH to train more than 12,000 students (45 percent female) with relevant job skills since 2004, of whom over 80 percent had secured jobs six months after graduation.

Donor
Private and Institutional Funds from Plan Netherlands
Amount
$500,000
Project Start Date
2004
Project End Date
2010
Technical Areas Covered
Livelihood, Workforce Development, and Interactive Learning

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